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  • Thai Dishes from the North East

    Thai Dishes from the North East

    The North East Phaak Tiew (Leaves of Tiew of the Cratoxylum family) is the Queen of the North-eastern vegetables. Young tops, leaves and blossoms are taken with Laab (a kind of dish of which the most important ingredients are minced meat or fish mixed with chillies and lime juice as well as roasted rice and mint leaves), Goi (a kind of dish like Yam but mostly with raw meat as main ingredient), Naam Prig, soup, and Khanom Chin Naam Ya (Steamed Rice Noodles with Curried Fish Sauce). Soup with Phaak Tiew has sour flavor. 1. Soup Dog Phaak Tiew (Soup with Phaak Tiew Blossoms) Medicinal value: Soup with Phaak Tiew Blossoms is a laxative, and also medicine to get rid of phlegm, to nourish the water element of the body, and relieve nerve-pain. The soup is harmful to the people having kidney…

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  • Spice Up Your Dishes with Argentine Chimichurri

    Spice Up Your Dishes with Argentine Chimichurri

    One of the favorite cooking methods in Argentina is, without a doubt, grilling. This style of cooking is derived from the original Argentinian Gaucho tradition of cooking fresh meat over a charcoal fire. To add flavor and tenderize the meat, Argentinians often marinate meats in Chimichurri. Food without Chimichurri just wouldn’t be tolerated in Argentina especially grilled meat to which it adds an amazing flavor. Ingredients: 1/3 packet of garlic salt 6 chilli peppers 2 sachets bouquet garni 1 large onion ½ tub of dried peppers 1 pint of vinegar 2 pints oil Directions: Boil all the ingredients, excluding oil, together in the vinegar for five minutes. Wait until the mixture cools. When the mixture has cooled, add the oil. Store in refrigerator. When you’re ready to barbecue or…

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  • White Wine Vinegar Spanish Boquerones

    White Wine Vinegar Spanish Boquerones

    Boquerones are small, fresh anchovies. Accompanied by crisp, fresh Spanish bread, a glass of ruby-red wine or refreshing Asturian cider, they are a delight to eat. Methods for preparing boquerones tend to vary slightly. However, the basic principles are always the same. You first have to clean and fillet the fish, which is simple enough, but rather tedious until you get the hang of it. Next, you soak the fillets, either in white wine vinegar or a mixture of half vinegar and half water. The vinegar will clean and bleach the fish and also soften any remaining little bones. Some people sprinkle the fish with salt; others feel that the fish is salty enough already. The fish has to be left for a good few hours soaking in the vinegar. Again, this tends to vary, with some Spaniards leaving them…

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